Random acts of violets

The first violets are out and they have reminded me of the Boston Marathon bombing, which was about a year ago. Charley Boorman made me smile with his tweet, “So sorry To hear about the Boston Explosions. Our hearts go out to those who lost their lives. What a cowardly act of violets.” I do not know whether his dylexia was at work here, or whether it was one of those auto correct jobs, but the phrase racketed through my head for several days.

Random acts of violets

By the tank.

Somewhere in a Kate Llewellyn journal (Burning), I read that the scent of violets rises up when a saint’s tomb is opened. I would like to think that the same kind of thing happens to murdered people. God protect us all from random acts of violets.

Look what else came up!

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In the ‘pink’ garden

After years of one crocus at a time I finally have abundance!

A few days later

Crocuses galore

 

Nice drop of rain

From Monday evening it rained for three days -  we got just under three inches of rain just how we like it, nice and slowly.

By the tanks

By the tanks

There is nothing better than lying in bed listening to it on the roof, at least until a new leak shows up – will have to get up there again with the silicone.

Dryland plants enjoying a rare treat.

Dryland plants enjoying a rare treat.

This morning the sun came out and revealed a green haze of winter grass which had been happily germinating through those rainy days.

Nice to have some green back.

Nice to have some green back.

 

 

 

 

I love bulbs

From Easter lilies and the first autumn crocus that pops up to whatever comes last in the garden in spring, I love them all.

I love bulbs

The blood lily and autumn crocus.

I think it’s the surprise factor of something that pops up where there was nothing before.

The other crocus

The other crocus

 

 

 

What a mess!

The other day whilst harvesting goji berries, I heard a little croak, the first all year. I had just about given up on frogs. Last year I’d brought in a few more tadpoles from a local waterhole but hadn’t seen any sign of them since.

At the end of March each year I remove the cover from the pond so I can see lovely reflections of the sky etc. I have to have the cover on over summer or I lose too much water through evaporation, but it looks ugly, and I’m happy when it comes off. However this is the sight that greeted me:

The frog pond

The frog pond

For over a year I have battled algae and plants which like to take over, and decided some months ago that when the cover came off again, I would have to pretty much start from scratch.

So this morning I wrestled with this awful grassy thing which forms big mats and cuts your hands to ribbons, and it is out! That big clump of sedge I will pull out and plant next to the pond, and the water irises will be repotted, I’ll have lots left over to give away if anyone wants any. I used to have purple and yellow water irises but the purple seems to have dominated the yellow ones and I haven’t seen one for a while.

The pond - half done

The pond – half done

I have come in for lunch and am tired – I think I might have to continue tomorrow!

 

Goji berries

Nearly five years have passed since I planted my goji berry bush. .Although it is a close relation of the African Boxthorn, which people around here curse, it comes from the Himalayas and is not as vigorous where I live.

The tag had a lovely picture of mountains on it and I decided I would plant it for Edi, who had at that time had ‘not long to go’. After saying goodbye to him on the 6th May 2009, I wanted to plant it then and there, but made myself wait until I’d heard of his death. When the headlines came on I would look at the TV for some strange reason, half expecting to hear it there. But it was after dark by the time the doctor phoned.

The goji berry bush

The goji berry bush

Next morning, my first morning as a widow, in it went. Later on I found out that it prefers shade – oh well!  Finally we are getting good fruit from it. Each one I eat I think of all the lovely vitamins it is said to have.

Goji berry

Goji berry

Beautiful blue plumbago

It’s a over a month since the big rain, and plants are starting to look thirsty again, although there are some exceptions like this lovely deep blue plumbago, which always looks best as summer goes into autumn. It is a pretty hardy plant when it comes to heat but it hates frost, so I have had to plant it in sheltered places in my garden.

Beautiful blue plumbago

Beautiful blue plumbago

It’s been a funny season so far, one month of autumn has already gone, but I have not had that lovely autumn mood that I usually love. I’m supposed to fall in love with this place all over again, and not be able to get enough of that lovely autumn light. I have been wondering why, and I think it is a combination of a few things, the weather for one, has been too hot or too cold to make it feel like autumn. I have also been rather busy traipsing all over the countryside taking my kids to mainly swimming-related things. And the third is that my autumn crocuses are late.

Many years we’ve had rain bang on the end of February, which has made the autumn crocus emerge a couple of days into March. Our rain was two weeks early, so the crocuses in my garden are late this year. One is only just unfurling now.

Autumn Crocus

Autumn Crocus

 

 

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